Item #: 4969-1
Availability: In Stock
In Stock Quantity: 21

Named in honor of a Scottish baron, the Livistonas are a uniquely captivating species. The Taraw Fan Palm is especially so. Despite doing quite well - even thriving - in Southern California it is rarely seen and almost unknown in the area. Recognized for its full head of cascading drooping leaves, it is easily recognized and appreciated in any landscape. Its divided blade-like leaves fan out up to 4 to 5 feet across, but the tips flow downward as unique to Livistonas. Its leaves are at their most lustrous and glossy in indirect light or shade. Its petioles bare ominously sharp teeth and provide a striking contrast against its lustrous green foliage.

The specimens in our collection grow rapidly with water in the heat of Riverside and those free of leaf bases have impressive, shiny red-brown trunks which may eventually gray with sun exposure. The trunk is equally impressive with decorative fiberious leaf bases, which look as if they were methodically hand wrapped to the tree with rolls of tan paper. As the stem reaches skyward, much light passes through its crown of long petioles as they extend out into largely segmented leaves that droop heavily in from the leaf tips. All this lends a rich tropical feel to the tree unmatched by any other tribe of palmate or costapalmate palm in our collection. The dramatic, jungle-like appearance is accented by the petiole's wild, shark tooth-like armature. Everything about this palm evokes a truly tropical, awe-inspiring environment that is far removed from the urban jungle of Southern California.

Price: $120.00
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    Clear Trunk Height:

    How we measure palms



    Conditions for Growth

    The Taraw fan palm will thrive in moist, heavy soil rich with organic matter most similar to the tropical climate of it native habitat. Surprisingly, we have had tremendous success with this plam in the heat of Riverside, CA. Offered partial shade protection in their formative years, this palm is said to even tolerate the Southern California deserts. Hardy to about 20-24 degrees, but as a practical matter, our grove has rarely experiences tempuratures below 29-30 degrees in the last 20 years.

    Growth Rate and Size

    The Taraw palm is said to grow at a moderate pace of a foot a year, but our experience is this palm is one our fastest growers, well exceeding a foot each year. It has a solitary trunk extending up to 60 feet tall and 1 foot wide when bare of leaf bases. It is a self-pruning specimen in maturity, making it an easy keeper and perfect to line up in rows.

    Description

    Solitary stem with a shiny red-brown color fading to gray with exposure, ringed with leaf scars, with canopy of 20-30 leaves, costapalmate, induplicate, divided midway and heavily drooping to about 30% of the segment. The leafbases will persiste when trimmed, but the tree is self-cleaning. Leaf width is about 4-5 feet in diameter at the end of a rather long 6 foot petiole that is heavily armed with shark-like teeth of various lengths along the margins. Inflorescence is about 5 feet long, heavily branched, and looks similar to a Brahea, with yellow flowers. Fruit is about 3/4 inch and glossy blue-gray.

    Transplanting

    This plant is moderately difficult to transplant. Survival rate is moderate to high.

    Livistona saribus

    Taraw Palm

    Landscape Environment

    Grow Region: 10A-11

    Origin: Southeast Asia, Indonesia and Philippines

    Drought Tolerance: High

    Cold Tolerance: Moderate. Will survive to into low 20s.

    Salt Tolerance: Moderate

    Soil: Tolerant to most soil types. Fertilizer recommended.

    Light: Loves full sun and does well in partial shade.

    Charateristics

    Mature Height: 60 feet

    Trunk: Ringed but smooth in appearance, dramatic red brown to pale gray with age, less than 12 inches in diameter without leaf bases , Solitary

    Leaf: Deep green leaf about 4-5 feet wide, divided about mid-way, bifid tip drooping over a third of the leaf segement length - though not to the extent of the decora variety

    Leaf Petiole: a long petiole extending over 6 feet with spectacular armature of various length

    Armature: Long, sharp teeth along margin of petiole

    Color:

    Flowers: 5 feet or longer, branching with yellow flowers similar to a Brahea

    Fruit: Small, glossy blue

    Human Uses:

    Classification

    Subfamily: Coryphoideae

    Tribe: Corypheae

    Subtribe: Livistoninae